Exelon split will help check utility power in Illinois — but there's still more to do

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Aaron Colonnese
Creative Associate

Author: Aaron Colonnese

Creative Associate

 

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Brown University

Aaron writes and designs materials with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network for U.S. PIRG. Aaron lives in Arlington, Massachusetts, and spends his spare time playing drums and going for long walks.

Illinois utility companies have long held corporate conflicts of interest — with potentially costly consequences for consumers.

One example: Commonwealth Edison's (ComEd) relationship to its parent company, Exelon, may help explain why ComEd has failed to deliver on promises made in a 2011 law that resulted in record profits for ComEd and higher costs for ratepayers.

Exelon's plans to separate its regulated utility business from its generation and customer-facing power supply business will help curb these types of conflicts. But the Illinois General Assembly must do more to fully address the problem, including by reforming utility political influence to no longer allow utilities to charge their customers for charitable contributions.

“Exelon’s ownership of ComEd has created longstanding conflicts of interests and Illinois consumers have suffered as a result. Separating Exelon’s generation assets from its regulated utilities is good news for ComEd’s customers and the public," said Illinois PIRG State Director Abe Scarr.

"Still, addressing the conflicts of interest that persist beyond an Exelon breakup should remain on the General Assembly’s agenda.”

Read more.

Learn more about our Take Our Power Back campaign to win restoration and utility reform for ComEd's customers and all Illinoisans.

Photo: Illinoisans who get their electricity from ComEd are paying 37 percent more for their electricity delivery than they did in 2012 — when in fact declines in power supply prices over the last decade should have led to lower electric bills. Credit: analogicus via Pixabay

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Aaron Colonnese
Creative Associate

Author: Aaron Colonnese

Creative Associate

 

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Brown University

Aaron writes and designs materials with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network for U.S. PIRG. Aaron lives in Arlington, Massachusetts, and spends his spare time playing drums and going for long walks.