| by
Matt Wellington
Director, Public Health Campaigns

Wendy's, the third largest burger chain in the country, committed to prohibiting the routine use of medically important antibotics in its meat supply chains by the end of 2030. 

 | by
Patricia Kelmar
Director, Health Care Campaigns

How drug companies keep prices high through tricky marketing and sales tactics

 | by
Teresa Murray
Consumer Watchdog

If you’re stunned that safety standards for inclined sleepers weren’t required before, get this: The new rules don’t take effect for a year. That’s one of the problems in the world of infant sleep.

From Main Street to Pennsylvania Avenue, people just want to fix their stuff.

As Microsoft joins the $2 trillion club, a shareholder group presses for Right to Repair 

 | by
Teresa Murray
Consumer Watchdog

With the new federal law that takes effect June 30, we should start seeing a decline in illegal robocalls. But the scams certainly won't halt overnight. Here are some tips to live by.

 | by
Patricia Kelmar
Director, Health Care Campaigns

Patients can be asked to consent to out-of-network care from certain providers under the No Surprises Act. That could be an expensive decision.

 | by
Ed Mierzwinski
Senior Director, Federal Consumer Program

Consumers increasingly are using digital peer-to-peer payment (P2P) apps for convenience. However, that convenience can quickly turn to inconvenience as the result of these apps’ often-confusing design, poor customer service and propensity for being used for scams and fraud. The number of written complaints to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) about these apps and other financial tools in the “mobile or digital wallet” category has skyrocketed in recent years, reaching new heights in 2021.

Cover photo by grinvalds via IStock 

From a win in the New York Senate, to a new bill in Congress: A roundup of news on Right to Repair